Spotlight on Gavin Smith, DPM

Posted on: April 16th, 2018 Posted by: Puget Sound Orthopaedics Posted in: News

Science and carpentry.  That’s what drew Dr. Gavin Smith, a podiatric foot and ankle surgeon into medicine.  “It’s gratifying to fix things that are broken and I love that it’s a little bit surgery, medicine, and dermatology combined.”  Repairing fractures and deformities are his favorites.  He’s also excited about new implants that are used in bunion surgery (surgery that corrects a deformed area of the foot near the big toe).  “The old plates and screws were on the surface and needed to be removed.  The new implants are intramedullary (inside the bone) so there are no prominent implants which leads to quicker healing.”

As a high schooler, Dr. Smith’s interests were in carpentry and mechanics.  “I took woodshop and autoshop for three years.  I spent my summers building furniture for the school district.” He’s had motorcycles since he was a pre-teen.  “I’ve owned a Harley (Davidson) for about seven years.  I like to take short trips around town on Saturdays.”

Mustache Dache supporting men’s health.

Dr. Smith also participates in Tough Mudder and Spartan events.  He chooses to take on Tough Mudder’s 12 mile races with 20+ obstacles and Spartan’s races that are 12-14 miles with 30+ obstacles.  These races test both mental and physical endurance.  “These events motivate me to stay in shape.  And participating with the right people makes it fun.”

When asked if he’d rather be a tiny elephant or a giant hamster he replied “a giant hamster”.  After a pause he said “actually I’d rather be our Shih Tzu, Maggie.  She gets to live in a nice house and lie around and do nothing all day”.  What cartoon character would he most want to switch lives with?  “Bugs Bunny, because he has his act together.”  If forced to choose between flying cars, robot housekeepers, or moon cities-without hesitation “flying cars.  Because who doesn’t want to fly a car?”

He loves what he does.  “I try to always put the patient first and treat them the same as family.  If you do what’s right, that’s what matters.”